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(04-12-2017, 03:24 AM)Darran Wrote: [ -> ]The LOL Story. 
The funny thing about all those comeback stories is that they make out as if CT were really big throughout the 70's. Well, here in the US, at least, their breakthrough didn't come until the very end of the decade - 1979. So they were big for what, one year? But I remember hearing Stop This Game, If You Want Me Love and Tonight it's You quite a lot on top 40 and AOR in the 80's, pre-LOL.
(04-14-2017, 09:24 PM)Lonely Summer Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-12-2017, 03:24 AM)Darran Wrote: [ -> ]The LOL Story. 
The funny thing about all those comeback stories is that they make out as if CT were really big throughout the 70's. Well, here in the US, at least, their breakthrough didn't come until the very end of the decade - 1979. So they were big for what, one year? But I remember hearing Stop This Game, If You Want Me Love and Tonight it's You quite a lot on top 40 and AOR in the 80's, pre-LOL.

Yeah, they were never as big as people make them out to be in these stories. Its more like a return to the charts than a comeback. Although it was all the way to number one with "the Flame". During the '70s and beyond the band has had more chart success in Canada than any other country. As far a singles they've only ever placed 3 songs in the top 10 ten in the US and 5 in Canada. Trace back the album placements and its the same. They consistently chart higher in Canada than anywhere.
a long time radio promo guy for a major label in Toronto, told me more than once, that in 1979, CHEAP TRICK was the biggest band on the planet. In Canada, all the radio stations wanted to play Surrender, I Want You To Want Me and Ain't That a Shame off Live at Budokan.
(04-18-2017, 12:00 AM)johnnymegabyte Wrote: [ -> ]a long time radio promo guy for a major label in Toronto, told me more than once, that in 1979, CHEAP TRICK was the biggest band on the planet. In Canada, all the radio stations wanted to play Surrender, I Want You To Want Me and Ain't That a Shame off Live at Budokan.

That is true, and Dream Police was nearly as successful as Budokan. Before that, radio didn't want to know about them. And after the monster year of 1979, their sales dropped off somewhat. I think they've always been a bit to quirky for consistent mainstream success. People like bands that sound the same from album to album, but thankfully CT are more varied than, say, Journey or Foreigner.